Every Tuesday I’ll be discussing a random book of my Goodreads TBR list. I’ll post the synopsis and why I’ve added it on my list. The real question is, should I read it or just let it go?


35504431Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. In his long-awaited return. (Source)

 


I’ve put this book in my TBR list as a was a huge fan of The fault in our stars (like most people I guess), I tried John Green’s other books but none spoke to me as much as TFIOS (Looking far Alaska was one of the worst books I have ever read to be honest..) Another reason why I’ve put this book on my TBR is because it handles mental illnesses such as OCD and anxiety and I feel like more books need to handle mental illnesses.

So, did you like it? Should I keep this in my TBR or just get rid of it?


Céline. ❤

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36373464Author: Sandhya Menon

Title: From Twinkle, with love

Publisher + date: May 22nd 2018 by Simon Pulse

Rating: ★

Genre: YA, Romance

Review copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a honest review, thank you!

When people show you who they are, you should believe them.

Synopsis

Aspiring filmmaker and wallflower Twinkle Mehra has stories she wants to tell and universes she wants to explore, if only the world would listen. So when fellow film geek Sahil Roy approaches her to direct a movie for the upcoming Summer Festival, Twinkle is all over it. The chance to publicly showcase her voice as a director? Dream come true. The fact that it gets her closer to her longtime crush, Neil Roy—a.k.a. Sahil’s twin brother? Dream come true x 2.

When mystery man “N” begins emailing her, Twinkle is sure it’s Neil, finally ready to begin their happily-ever-after. The only slightly inconvenient problem is that, in the course of movie-making, she’s fallen madly in love with the irresistibly adorkable Sahil.

Twinkle soon realizes that resistance is futile: The romance she’s got is not the one she’s scripted. But will it be enough?

Told through the letters Twinkle writes to her favorite female filmmakers, From Twinkle, with Love navigates big truths about friendship, family, and the unexpected places love can find you.

What I think of it

Unfortunately I did not finish this book.

I just couldn’t get into it, the first 30% of the book are very cute and sweet, even made me laugh out loud several times but once you’re over the 30% it quickly goes downhill.

Twinkle becomes very self-centered on every aspect to the point that her attidude becomes very annoying and even made me frustrated while reading. I personally hate it when a book puts me into a bad mood so I decided it’s for the best to just drop it.

I do want to point out a few good things about this book though, for example, Twinkle is an Indian girl who’s a huge femenist. Her views on some stuff are very interesting and refreshing. It’s one of the reasons why I’m gutted I disliked the story after all as we do need more books about femenists ready to take over the world!


Céline. ❤

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Every Tuesday I’ll be discussing a random book of my Goodreads TBR list. I’ll post the synopsis and why I’ve added it on my list. The real question is, should I read it or just let it go?


35558893Harry Potter: A History of Magic is the official book of the exhibition, a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration between Bloomsbury, J.K. Rowling and the brilliant curators of the British Library. It promises to take readers on a fascinating journey through the subjects studied at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry – from Alchemy and Potions classes through to Herbology and Care of Magical Creatures. Each chapter showcases a treasure trove of artefacts from the British Library and other collections around the world, beside exclusive manuscripts, sketches and illustrations from the Harry Potter archive. There’s also a specially commissioned essay for each subject area by an expert, writer or cultural commentator, inspired by the contents of the exhibition – absorbing, insightful and unexpected contributions from Steve Backshall, the Reverend Richard Coles, Owen Davies, Julia Eccleshare, Roger Highfield, Steve Kloves, Lucy Mangan, Anna Pavord and Tim Peake, who offer a personal perspective on their magical theme. Readers will be able to pore over ancient spell books, amazing illuminated scrolls that reveal the secret of the Elixir of Life, vials of dragon’s blood, mandrake roots, painted centaurs and a genuine witch’s broomstick, in a book that shows J.K. Rowling’s magical inventions alongside their cultural and historical forebears. This is the ultimate gift for Harry Potter fans, curious minds, big imaginations, bibliophiles and readers around the world who missed out on the chance to see the exhibition in person. (Source)

I’ve added this book because I’m a huge fan of Harry Potter but I heard so many mixed reviews of it which is why I’m not sure whether or not I should spend about €20 on this. So what do you guys think? Should I add this one to my collection of Harry Potter books or should I just forget about it?


Céline. ❤

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