Every Tuesday I’ll be discussing a random book of my Goodreads TBR list. I’ll post the synopsis and why I’ve added it on my list. The real question is, should I read it or just let it go?


35504431Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. In his long-awaited return. (Source)

 


I’ve put this book in my TBR list as a was a huge fan of The fault in our stars (like most people I guess), I tried John Green’s other books but none spoke to me as much as TFIOS (Looking far Alaska was one of the worst books I have ever read to be honest..) Another reason why I’ve put this book on my TBR is because it handles mental illnesses such as OCD and anxiety and I feel like more books need to handle mental illnesses.

So, did you like it? Should I keep this in my TBR or just get rid of it?


Céline. ❤

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36373464Author: Sandhya Menon

Title: From Twinkle, with love

Publisher + date: May 22nd 2018 by Simon Pulse

Rating: ★

Genre: YA, Romance

Review copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a honest review, thank you!

When people show you who they are, you should believe them.

Synopsis

Aspiring filmmaker and wallflower Twinkle Mehra has stories she wants to tell and universes she wants to explore, if only the world would listen. So when fellow film geek Sahil Roy approaches her to direct a movie for the upcoming Summer Festival, Twinkle is all over it. The chance to publicly showcase her voice as a director? Dream come true. The fact that it gets her closer to her longtime crush, Neil Roy—a.k.a. Sahil’s twin brother? Dream come true x 2.

When mystery man “N” begins emailing her, Twinkle is sure it’s Neil, finally ready to begin their happily-ever-after. The only slightly inconvenient problem is that, in the course of movie-making, she’s fallen madly in love with the irresistibly adorkable Sahil.

Twinkle soon realizes that resistance is futile: The romance she’s got is not the one she’s scripted. But will it be enough?

Told through the letters Twinkle writes to her favorite female filmmakers, From Twinkle, with Love navigates big truths about friendship, family, and the unexpected places love can find you.

What I think of it

Unfortunately I did not finish this book.

I just couldn’t get into it, the first 30% of the book are very cute and sweet, even made me laugh out loud several times but once you’re over the 30% it quickly goes downhill.

Twinkle becomes very self-centered on every aspect to the point that her attidude becomes very annoying and even made me frustrated while reading. I personally hate it when a book puts me into a bad mood so I decided it’s for the best to just drop it.

I do want to point out a few good things about this book though, for example, Twinkle is an Indian girl who’s a huge femenist. Her views on some stuff are very interesting and refreshing. It’s one of the reasons why I’m gutted I disliked the story after all as we do need more books about femenists ready to take over the world!


Céline. ❤

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Every Tuesday I’ll be discussing a random book of my Goodreads TBR list. I’ll post the synopsis and why I’ve added it on my list. The real question is, should I read it or just let it go?


35558893Harry Potter: A History of Magic is the official book of the exhibition, a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration between Bloomsbury, J.K. Rowling and the brilliant curators of the British Library. It promises to take readers on a fascinating journey through the subjects studied at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry – from Alchemy and Potions classes through to Herbology and Care of Magical Creatures. Each chapter showcases a treasure trove of artefacts from the British Library and other collections around the world, beside exclusive manuscripts, sketches and illustrations from the Harry Potter archive. There’s also a specially commissioned essay for each subject area by an expert, writer or cultural commentator, inspired by the contents of the exhibition – absorbing, insightful and unexpected contributions from Steve Backshall, the Reverend Richard Coles, Owen Davies, Julia Eccleshare, Roger Highfield, Steve Kloves, Lucy Mangan, Anna Pavord and Tim Peake, who offer a personal perspective on their magical theme. Readers will be able to pore over ancient spell books, amazing illuminated scrolls that reveal the secret of the Elixir of Life, vials of dragon’s blood, mandrake roots, painted centaurs and a genuine witch’s broomstick, in a book that shows J.K. Rowling’s magical inventions alongside their cultural and historical forebears. This is the ultimate gift for Harry Potter fans, curious minds, big imaginations, bibliophiles and readers around the world who missed out on the chance to see the exhibition in person. (Source)

I’ve added this book because I’m a huge fan of Harry Potter but I heard so many mixed reviews of it which is why I’m not sure whether or not I should spend about €20 on this. So what do you guys think? Should I add this one to my collection of Harry Potter books or should I just forget about it?


Céline. ❤

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35429999Author: Carlie Sorosiak

Title: Wild blue wonder

Publisher + date: June 26th 2018 by HarperTeen

Rating: ★★★★

Genre: YA, Romance, contemporary

Review copy provided by HarperTeen in exchange for a honest review, thank you

Scary things and amazing things coexist.
The world is full of wildness and wonder. And a lot of it is good.

Synopsis

There are two monsters in this story. One of them is me.

Ask anyone in Winship, Maine, and they’ll tell you the summer camp Quinn’s family owns is a magical place. Paper wishes hang from the ceiling. Blueberries grow in the dead of winter. According to local legend, a sea monster even lurks off the coast. Mostly, there’s just a feeling that something extraordinary could happen there.

Like Quinn falling in love with her best friend, Dylan.

After the accident, the magic drained from Quinn’s life. Now Dylan is gone, the camp is a lonely place, and Quinn knows it’s her fault.

But the new boy in town, Alexander, doesn’t see her as the monster she believes herself to be. As Quinn lets herself open up again, she begins to understand the truth about love, loss, and monsters—real and imagined.

What I think of it

This book absolutely broke my heart in a million pieces.

Quinn lost her best friend Dylan last year due to a tragic accident and blames herself for what happened. As much as she’s hurting she decides to fix the boat that was at the accident, which helps her heal. She meets someone new and has to face the monster she thinks she has become ever since the accident.

I really loved the chapters where you go back a year ago to the summer where Dylan was still alive, it felt really personal.
The fact that Quinn is quite an original character (she loves marine biology for example) made it even better.

Wild blue wonder
 shows what it is like to lose a close friend and how hard it is to cope when that person is gone.

This is a great book, so if you love emotional contemporary stories that will rip your heart apart, please pick this up. It’s so worth it


Céline. ❤

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35608668Author: Emily Barr

Title: The truth and lies of Ella Black

Publisher + date: January 11th 2018 by Penguin

Rating: ★

Genre: YA

Review copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a honest review, thank you!

Synopsis

Ella Black seems to live the life most other seventeen-year-olds would kill for . . .

Until one day, telling her nothing, her parents whisk her off to Rio de Janeiro. Determined to find out why, Ella takes her chance and searches through their things.

And realises her life has been a lie.

Her mother and father aren’t hers at all. Unable to comprehend the truth, Ella runs away, to the one place they’ll never think to look – the favelas.

But there she learns a terrible secret – the truth about her real parents and their past. And the truth about a mother, desperate for a daughter taken from her seventeen years ago

What I think of it

Normally when I get an ARC I always finish the book no matter how bad it is, but this time I just couldn’t finish it. It’s written very poorly which made me laugh sometimes, yes it’s THAT bad.

In the book we follow Ella Black, which is in my opinion the biggest bitch and ungrateful piece of .. I ever met (I’m not even sorry). She thinks the world turns around her and actually wants her parents to get divorced, with no solid reason why whatsoever.

For some reason the author decided that having a mental illness is a good excuse for animal abuse. Yes you have read this right, at some point Ella ends up killing a bird with a hammer, like?? At this point I just felt anger and disappointment that an author actually thought this would be a good idea to put in a young adults book without any warning whatsoever. I just decided to stop reading.

It upsets me because it doesn’t only puts people with a mental illness in a bad light but also people who are adopted.

I have read The one memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr which was so much better but after this book I refuse to read a book of her ever again.


Céline. ❤

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33631747Title: Broken Wishbones and Empty Spaces

Author: Pyrokardia

Publisher + date: January 22nd 2017 by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Rating: ★

Genre: poetry

 

 

“We fell
into the book of love
stumbling through the pages
filling up the paragraphs
creating new chapters
right till the very last page
where we fell
out of the book
breaking into pieces
as we fell apart.”

Synopsis

This book is not for healing,
it is a shelter for your breaking
you will leave
but you’ll leave whole.

This prolific collection of poems; “Broken Wishbones & Empty Spaces” explains what it means to be broken, how it feels to be broken, and how it feels to thirst for love while being broken. It is a book that understands and justifies the melancholy in love. Yet amidst this hurt, it still acknowledges love as a good thing, if only we could find it, give it, and take it the right way.

“Broken Wishbones & Empty Spaces” heals a reader simply by acknowledgment. It skillfully teaches how to gracefully bear love’s forlorn.

Pyrokardia’s second collection of poetry couldn’t have been written in a better way and it is a perfect comrade and companion to his first collection titled “A Beautiful Mess”.

What I think of it

I heard so many good things about this book, so many people promoting it on social media so when I saw it on amazon kindle in sale I immediately bought it and started to read.. and I was immediately disappointed.

This book seems like it was written by a 12 year old having her first broken heart and is feeling like the whole world is against her.. This is probably a very unpopular opinion but I really can’t wrap my head around the fact that this book gets so many high ratings..

I know this was personal feelings and thoughts but this isn’t poetry, this doesn’t deserve to be next to great poetry books.. Unfortunately we can’t all be poets nor can we all be writers.

To be completely honest I did finish the book as I was hoping it would get better at some point but it didn’t.. So I cancelled my order and asked my money back.


Céline. ❤

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33280872Author: Colleen Hoover

Title: Without Merit

Publisher + date: October 3rd 2017 by Atria Books

Rating: ★★★★★

genre: NA, Romance, Mental health

 

 

Tuqburni is used to describe the all-encompassing feeling of not being able to live without someone. Which is why the literal translation is, ‘You bury me.”

Synopsis

Not every mistake deserves a consequence. Sometimes the only thing it deserves is forgiveness.

The Voss family is anything but normal. They live in a repurposed church, newly baptized Dollar Voss. The once cancer-stricken mother lives in the basement, the father is married to the mother’s former nurse, the little half-brother isn’t allowed to do or eat anything fun, and the eldest siblings are irritatingly perfect. Then, there’s Merit.

Merit Voss collects trophies she hasn’t earned and secrets her family forces her to keep. While browsing the local antiques shop for her next trophy, she finds Sagan. His wit and unapologetic idealism disarm and spark renewed life into her—until she discovers that he’s completely unavailable. Merit retreats deeper into herself, watching her family from the sidelines when she learns a secret that no trophy in the world can fix.

Fed up with the lies, Merit decides to shatter the happy family illusion that she’s never been a part of before leaving them behind for good. When her escape plan fails, Merit is forced to deal with the staggering consequences of telling the truth and losing the one boy she loves.

What I think of it

I heard many mixed opinions about this book but I have to say that I absolutely loved it. Colleen her books (like It ends with us and Too late) are moving more towards the darker subjects. This one handles abuse, mental illness, homosexuality, suicide and the refugee crisis.. Which I think Colleen has handled very well and realistic.

I really liked how unique Merit actually is, a young girl collecting trophies she didn’t even win, says enough right? But my favorite character must be Luck, I won’t say why but read the book and you’ll know right away, he’s a bit of a dick first but you’ll learn to love him.

I really recommend this book but do know it handles hard and real subjects, some parts are actually really sad and I proper cried. But it’s totally worth it.

With Merit


Céline. ❤

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34227670Title: A taxonomy of love

Author: Rachael Allen

Publisher + date: January 9th 2018 by Amulet Books

Rating: ★★★

Genre: YA, Romance

Review copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a honest review, thank you!

If it’s a matter of us versus them, I always want to be on the side of people who choose kindness over hate.

Synopsis

The moment Spencer meets Hope the summer before seventh grade, it’s . . . something at first sight. He knows she’s special, possibly even magical. The pair become fast friends, climbing trees and planning world travels. After years of being outshone by his older brother and teased because of his Tourette syndrome, Spencer finally feels like he belongs. But as Hope and Spencer get older and life gets messier, the clear label of “friend” gets messier, too.

Through sibling feuds and family tragedies, new relationships and broken hearts, the two grow together and apart, and Spencer, an aspiring scientist, tries to map it all out using his trusty system of taxonomy. He wants to identify and classify their relationship, but in the end, he finds that life doesn’t always fit into easy-to-manage boxes, and it’s this messy complexity that makes life so rich and beautiful.

What I think of it

If I had read this book at the age of 16 I would have probably liked it more, it was very cute and everything but I can’t get rid of the feeling it’s ‘yet another typical YA romance book’ which is why I only gave it 3 stars.

The only difference from others was the fact that the main character has Tourette syndrome, which made me want to finish this book. I’m glad this subject gets discussed in this book as not many youngsters know what Tourette syndrome actually is and I hope with reading this book people will get a better look on it.

The story in general is very cute and so are the characters. It’s nice to see how the characters develop throughout the story and how romance comes out of it all, but like I said it’s a typical cute YA story, perfect if you want to read something light.


Céline. ❤

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35606560Title: The sun and her flowers

Author: Rupi Kaur

Publisher + date: October 3rd 2017 by Andrews McMeel Publishing

Rating: ★★★★

Genre: Poetry

 

“i have survived far too much to go quietly
let a meteor take me
call the thunder for backup
my death will be grand
the land will crack
the sun will eat itself

– the day I leave”

Synopsis

From Rupi Kaur, the #1 New York Timesbestselling author of milk and honey, comes her long-awaited second collection of poetry. A vibrant and transcendent journey about growth and healing. Ancestry and honoring one’s roots. Expatriation and rising up to find a home within yourself.

Divided into five chapters and illustrated by Kaur, the sun and her flowers is a journey of wilting, falling, rooting, rising, and blooming. A celebration of love in all its forms.

What I think of it

Ever since Milk and Honey I’ve been quite a fan of Rupi.

The sun and her flowers has some great poetry work of her again, this time mostly about where we come from, our emotions and suffering and immigrants.

I did love the fact that there were longer poems that took a couple of pages and also had a deeper meaning. The illustrations were absolutely wonderful as always, yet some of them reminded me of some in her previous book. I also noticed that a couple of her poems from the previous book were in this one too which got me a bit disappointed.

Although I loved The sun and her flowers I could only rate it 4 stars as I loved her previous book more, it spoke to me more than this one.


Céline. ❤

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They both die at the end by Adam Silvera

33385229Title: They both die at the end

Author: Adam Silvera

Publisher + date: September 5th 2017 by HarperTeen

Rating: ★★★★★

Genre: YA, Glbt

Review copy provided by HarperCollins UK in exchange for a honest review, thank you!

“But no matter what choices we make – solo or together – our finish line remains the same … No matter how we choose to live, we both die at the end.”

Synopsis

On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure and to live a lifetime in a single day.

What I think of it

I finished this book on the train on the way home yesterday and I’m still crying over it.

In They both die at the end we follow 2 boys who got the call of Death-Cast, which is basically a company that call people on the day they’re going to die to tell them it’s their last day alive (pretty creepy right?). Both Mateo and Rufus, who are in that time total strangers to each other, decide to give the Last Friend app a go (an app where Deckers aka soon to be dead people can talk to each other and meet). Rufus and Mateo find each other on the app and it’s the start of a day full of emotional events but also happy moments.

The title says it all, so you know what happens at the end but throughout the whole book you’re just hoping there’s a massive plot twist and they survive. I wanted to punch the woman sitting next to me at the end of the book, I was so angry.

Despite the anger and massive sadness at the end of the book I do have to say that I loved every page. As soon as you start the book you’re just so into it that it’s hard to stop reading. I received this book from the publisher but I loved it so much that I’m going to order a paperback.

I loved this book so much but I’m SO glad Death-Cast doesn’t exists in real life (and let’s keep it that way)

Adam Silvera never disappoints and I can’t wait for his next book.

(Also, don’t finish the book like me in a public place unless you want to ugly cry in front of everyone)


Céline. ❤

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